Posts Tagged ‘ASPCA’

Dognappers take pit bulls from shelter: Police believe animals stolen for dogfights; four arrested

May 29, 2008

Chewie, the tough and nimble pit bull kept for over a year at the county’s animal shelter as evidence in a felony dogfighting trial, got a brief taste of freedom Sunday night.

But it wasn’t the kind that animal welfare advocates, who have been trying to find sanctuaries for Chewie and seven other battle-scarred dogs dubbed the “Great Eight,” had been hoping for.

Four intruders broke into the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service twice over the Memorial Day weekend, stealing two pit bulls Saturday night and nabbing Chewie on Sunday.

Click here for the full article.

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CSI goes four-legged

April 2, 2008

I first encountered an animal cruelty case as a veterinary student eight years ago. The patient, a pet rabbit, had a 10 centimetre cut across her left thigh. The wound itself was clean, the edges neat. My boss explained that this was consistent with the use of a sharp instrument, probably a razor blade. It was the third occasion a rabbit from this household had come in with the same kind of wound.

I was dumbfounded when my boss agreed to stitch up the wound without grilling the owner, an unhappy-looking teenage boy accompanied by his distraught mother. Surely we had a duty of care not to return this rabbit to a high-risk household. We could seize the rabbit and notify the authorities, putting an end to this cycle of cruelty.

“It would never get to court,” my boss explained. “How would you prove it?”

She had a point. We’d be unlikely to find a witness willing to testify, given both boy and mother reported that the rabbit had simply “fallen over”. We didn’t have the resources to collect samples for forensic testing, and we had only written records to back up our claims that rabbits from the same household had come in with similar wounds.

Veterinarians have always worked on the front line of animal welfare, but when it comes to animal cruelty, many have felt they can do little more than patch up or put down abused animals.

But times are changing. This month the University of Florida Centre for Forensic Medicine and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) will host the first international conference on veterinary forensics.

Click here for the full article.

Animal rights groups pick up momentum

January 28, 2008
The growing influence of animal rights activists increasingly is affecting daily life, touching everything from the foods Americans eat to what they study in law school, where they buy their puppies and even whether they should enjoy a horse-drawn carriage ride in New York’s Central Park.

Animal activist groups such as the Humane Society of the United States and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) say they are seeing a spike in membership as their campaigns spread.

“There’s been an explosion of interest” in animal welfare issues, says David Favre, a Michigan State University law professor and animal law specialist. “Groups like the Humane Society of the United States and PETA have brought to our social awareness their concerns about animals and all matter of creatures.”

Click here to read the full article. 

200 Animals Seized By SPCA May Be Put Up For Adoption

January 28, 2008

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Two hundred neglected animals seized in east Texas may soon need a new home. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals rescued the 200 animals — including 26 hissing cockroaches and two bearded dragons — from a home near Marshall on Friday.

Click here to read the full article.

Today, January 5th, is National Bird Day!

January 5, 2008

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To help celebrate, the ASPCA published this list, “Top Ten Ways to Keep Your Bird Safe from Kitchen Dangers.”

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Also, from the National Bird Day official site, here’s 10 Things You Can Do to Make Your Bird Happy.

  1. Provide a healthy and varied diet — not just seeds, but grains, beans, vegetables (cooked and raw) formulated pellets, and some fruit. (Harmful foods include chocolate, avocado, highly processed or overly salted foods, human junk food, and caffeine.)
  2. Give your bird the largest enclosure possible — no space is too big for a creature adapted to flying through jungles and across savannas.
  3. Provide daily exercise and ample out-of-cage time, preferably to include free flying in a safe, supervised environment. (Bird-proofing a room for out-of-cage time includes keeping birds away from items containing lead and zinc, and from paint chips, ceiling fans, electrical cords, cats and dogs, and open windows.)
  4. Offer a variety of toys and enrichment activities. (Buy toys from “Out of this World Bird Toys” and help support bird rescue.)
  5. Provide plenty of socialization with other birds and/or human caretakers.
  6. Give access to unfiltered sunlight and/or full-spectrum lighting. Birds need exposure to UVA and UVB rays from direct sunlight (windows block necessary UV rays) or full-spectrum lighting to synthesize vitamin D necessary for bone health.
  7. Offer daily or weekly misting with a clean spray bottle of water to promote feather and skin health and for fun! Some birds prefer to bathe in a small container (like their water dish); others enjoy being misted with water. It is important to allow the birds to air-dry in a warm room or in the sunshine.
  8. Develop games and teach your bird skills (“jobs”) like foraging or treasure hunts (this can be done in the house or with creative toys in the cage), cleaning up toys by putting them in a basket.
  9. Provide a secure enclosure, carrier, or harness so your bird can enjoy the outdoors with you.
  10. Place multiple perches/stands throughout the house so that your bird can benefit from ambient “flock time” while being included in family activities like watching TV or movies, preparing meals, playing cards or games.

ASPCA commercial is probably pretty effective

January 5, 2008

The Vancouver Humane Society has issued its recommended top 10 New Year’s resolutions to make life better for animals

December 26, 2007

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Here are the society’s 10 suggestions:

– Don’t buy eggs from caged hens. If you choose to buy eggs, buy certified organic eggs instead. They’re guaranteed to be free-range and have the highest welfare standards (www.chickenout.ca).

– If you’re looking for a companion animal, adopt a homeless animal from a local shelter. Don’t buy exotic pets or animals sold in pet stores or by breeders.

– Eat less meat, starting with one meat-free dinner a week – or, better yet, go vegetarian!

– Get your dog/cat spayed or neutered and tell everyone who has a pet to do the same.

– Don’t patronize zoos, animal circuses, rodeos or any other event exploiting animals.

– Don’t buy fur – not even fur trim.

– Switch to cruelty-free and non-animal-tested products.

– Become a supporter of an animal charity.

– Report animal cruelty to the ASPCA.

– Do something kind for animals every day – take your neighbour’s dog for walk, write a letter to the editor supporting animals, hug your cat.

Click here to read the full article.

This is another one of those posts that I may or may not personally agree with, but feel that the information should be available for discourse. For example, I don’t believe that zoos and rodeos inherently exploit animals, and I myself do not choose to be a vegetarian. But like I’ve said before, one of the major goals of Kitty Mowmow’s Animal Expo is to provide a starting-point for discussing animal-related issues.