Posts Tagged ‘Beef’

Eat more squirrel?

May 27, 2008

The latest “ethical” food in England is squirrel. That’s right, those fuzzy-tailed little rodents that scurry about your yard. Of course, Southerners have always eaten squirrels. It was a part of our food pyramid, and we didn’t give it up until we could afford hamburger.

Rural Southern families always have depended on the family sharpshooter to furnish a little alternative meat for the family table: squirrels, rabbits, possums, quail and other wild game. When the South finally caught up financially with the rest of the nation, we turned to beef, lamb, etc. If wild game is involved in Southern meals today, it is likely duck or deer meat. But there are those who still enjoy an occasional squirrel or rabbit, and certainly quail is always a treat.

On my visits to the backcountry of England, I have observed rabbit hutches in most backyards, but it seems that squirrel meat has caught the English fancy, and the rodent meat is in much demand, according to recent articles in British newspapers.

One newspaper account reports that squirrels are “low in fat, low in food miles and completely free range.” In other words, “environmentally friendly.” Some Brits claim that, “The grey squirrel is about as ethical a dish as it is possible to serve.” Hunters provide the meat to butcher shops, and the shop owners say they can’t get enough to satiate the hunger for the meat. British women even exchange squirrel recipes.

Click here for the full article.

Animal rights activists owe technology a thank you

March 13, 2008

An undercover vegan wired with a camera no bigger than a sugar cube spent six weeks last fall working at a Southern California slaughterhouse. To fit in, he brought sandwiches made with soy riblets and ate them in a dusty parking lot with the other workers.

He tried not to worry about the emotional toll that long days escorting cows to the kill might have. He had more practical concerns, like whether the camera switch hidden in his pocket would fail or a cow would smash into him and crack the recording equipment taped to his body.

The Humane Society of the United States first gave a 32-minute video made from his footage to the San Bernardino County district attorney, then in January released an edited version on its Web site and to a newspaper. The video showed workers flipping sick dairy cows with forklifts, prodding them with electricity and dragging them with chains to be processed into ground meat, some of which likely ended up in chili and tacos at public school cafeterias.

It was as if someone gave Upton Sinclair a video camera and a Web link. Animal cruelty charges were filed, the slaughterhouse was shut down and Congress held hearings. The Agriculture Department announced the recall of more than 143 million pounds of meat — the largest in the nation’s history. (Cows so sick they can’t walk can’t legally be processed into food because they may have mad cow disease, also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, a form of which can be passed on to humans.)

After more than 25 years of tactics that have included tossing a dead raccoon on to the lunch plate of Anna Wintour, the Vogue editor; boycotting fast-food restaurants; and staging legal challenges, the animal rights movement had a bona fide hit.

A new generation of cameras so small they can be hidden in eyeglass frames or a hat — together with the rise of YouTube and the growing appeal of so-called citizen journalism — has done for animal rights advocates what the best-organized protest could not. Perhaps more than other social agitators, people concerned about animals raised for food have discovered that downloadable video can be the most potent weapon in their arsenal.

Click here for the full article.

For more animal-esque music, news, and issues, tune in to Kitty Mowmow’s Animal Expo online at www.thecapstone.ua.edu, Sunday nights 8-10 central.

See the video that led to beef recall

February 18, 2008

In aftermath of beef recall, watch video and take action to protect downer cows.

Take action for animal welfare standards for federal purchases!
 

February 18, 2008

 

Beef Recall Underscores Need to Protect “Downer” Cows

Dear Kitty Mowmow,

Take action now!Yesterday, the USDA issued the largest recall of beef in U.S. history, the latest action in response to The Humane Society of the United States’ groundbreaking undercover investigation of a dairy cow slaughter plant in Southern California.

The recall of 143 million pounds of beef came two days after San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos filed criminal charges against slaughter plant workers caught on video torturing crippled cattle, and two weeks after the USDA shut down that slaughter plant.

Our undercover investigation revealed shocking abuses of “downed” dairy cows — those who are too sick or injured to walk — at the Hallmark Meat Packing Company slaughter plant. Cows too weak to stand were dragged along the ground, shocked with electric prods, rammed with forklifts, and even forced to endure water being forced into their noses and throats — an act right out of the manual on water boarding.

Please watch our investigative video, and then take action today to stop this cruelty from happening again.

Our video of the cruelty is very difficult to watch. Even worse is the thought that an outfit like Hallmark Meat Packing Company got away with this kind of abuse every day, without proper oversight from the USDA.

Urge the USDA to tighten its lax enforcement of the downer rule and to close the rule’s loophole — so that cows who are obviously in no shape to walk are not brought to slaugherhouses in the first place and then abused once they are there.

Thank you for all you do for animals.

Sincerely,

Wayne Pacelle
President & CEO
The Humane Society of the United States