Posts Tagged ‘Farm Animals’

I Love Moo: Tales From A N.Y. Animal Sanctuary

June 16, 2008

Moo had a little crush on me, and I could all but return his affections.

The brown-haired boy possessed saucer-size eyes, a sturdy build and a sweet disposition. But what really tugged at my heart was his story of survival. The super-friendly bull, who had trailed me through the pasture like a lovelorn teen, had been found tied to a car during his calfhood. He was saved by one animal shelter, then recently relocated to another, Farm Sanctuary near Watkins Glen, N.Y.

Moo is not alone — here, at the country’s largest farm animal-rescue facility, or with his grim history. The safe haven takes in hundreds of farm animals, who, if they could talk, would tell similar stories. There’s Morgan, a snow-white rooster discovered in a Brooklyn pet store dyed like an Easter egg; Mayfly, an experiment in a school hatching project; and Winnie, a 500-pound pig who escaped a backyard barbecue (featuring her) in Connecticut. She now is the alpha pig of the pen.

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MRSA from farm animals found in humans in UK for first time

June 11, 2008

Three people have been infected with a form of MRSA usually found in pigs, the first time any humans in Britain have been infected by an animal strain of the superbug.

The variation has been found in farm animals and humans on the Continent, causing serious heart, bone, blood and skin diseases, as well as pneumonia.

Dr Giles Edwards, the director of the Scottish MRSA Reference Laboratory, said three people in Scotland had contracted the strain, known as ST398, in recent months.

“A lot of the patients who got this infection in Holland and Canada have been people who work with animals, such as farmers and vets. But none of the three individuals in Scotland have been in contact with animals, not that we could find.”

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A Rescued Goat Gets a Chance for a Normal Life

May 2, 2008

They are both amputees: She lost part of her right leg to bone cancer at the age of 10, and he lost part of his left leg four months ago because of an injury he most likely suffered at a Brooklyn slaughterhouse.

Her name is Jenny Brown, and she is a 36-year-old television producer turned animal rights advocate. His name is Albie, and he is a goat of unknown age and breed.

They met last August, after Albie was plucked from Prospect Park and taken to the animal sanctuary Ms. Brown has owned here since 2004. Albie was malnourished and sickly at the time, his mouth covered in sores, his leg and hoof badly infected, Ms. Brown recalled. His injuries seemed to indicate that he had been hogtied before he broke free and made his way to the park.

Ms. Brown said that she tried to save Albie’s leg, treating it with ointments and homeopathic remedies, but that the wound would not heal. In December, Albie’s leg was amputated just above the knee.

He is now awaiting a prosthesis, a very rare indulgence for a farm animal. And the same technician who fitted Ms. Brown with a new artificial leg is also designing Albie’s.

“I’ve been an amputee for most of my life, but I can run a farm, I can wrestle animals, I can carry bales of hay, thanks to modern prosthetics,” Ms. Brown said. “I thought it would be only fair to give Albie the same chance to live a normal life.”

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Rapid rise in dumped pets – RSPCA

April 28, 2008

The RSPCA says it was called on to save nearly 150,000 animals last year.

Many of these were farm animals and pets rescued during the summer floods, or birds injured by oil spills.

However, 7,347 rescued animals were abandoned pets, compared with 5,959 in 2006. The charity warned that abandoning pets was an offence.

Examples of dumped animals included a litter of kittens left in a dustbin bag, and a rabbit abandoned in a box in a crushing machine at a recycling centre.

Excuses given by owners who no longer wanted to look after their pets were said to have included: “My dog hurts my legs when she wags her tail,” and “my cat doesn’t match my new carpet.”

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Farm animals are prescribed for mental health

April 24, 2008

Weekly contact with farm animals may help in treating people with psychiatric disorders, researchers in Norway say.

Bente Berget and Bjarne Braastad of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in As, Norway, conducted a randomized controlled study of 90 patients — 59 women and 31 men — with schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety and personality disorders. The study subjects completed self-assessment questionnaires on quality of life, coping ability and self-efficacy — self-judgment of goal meeting capabilities — before a 12-week period spending three hours twice a week working with the farm animals.

“During the six months follow-up period self-efficacy was significantly better in the treatment group, but not in the control group,” the researchers said in a statement.

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Anti-cruelty farm animals bill qualifies for state ballot

April 11, 2008

A measure that proponents say would provide basic protection for 20 million farm animals in California has qualified for the November ballot.

California Secretary of state Debra Bowen certified the Prevention of Farm Animal Cruelty Act for the Nov. 4 general election.

The measure would mandate that farm animals including cattle, pigs and chickens would be given enough room to turn around and extend their limbs in the crates and cages in which they are confined by food producers.

If approved, the law would not take effect until 2015, allowing seven years for compliance.

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Should Genetic Modification And RNA Interference Be Used On Farm Animals?

April 11, 2008

A range of new technologies including genetic modification (GM) and RNA Interference are being deployed to improve the health of farm animals in a series of European and global initiatives. The ground was laid for a European platform to develop new treatments that exploit these technologies at a recent workshop organised by the European Science Foundation (ESF).

The workshop highlighted the interlocking themes underlying the debate over livestock disease research, following a series of high profile epidemics and pandemics over the last two decades, including BSE, foot and mouth disease, bird flu, and PRRSV (Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus) in pigs, coupled with the public relations problems facing GM technologies.

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China raises animal disease alarm for holiday

January 23, 2008

chinese-farming.jpg

China has warned of an increased risk of animal-related health epidemics during its lunar new year holiday and said many local governments were not prepared, state media reported on Wednesday.

The heightened risk in a country prone to animal diseases stems from the massive numbers of travellers and livestock expected to be transported around the country for China’s biggest holiday, Xinhua news agency said.

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