Posts Tagged ‘Goats’

With animals living longer and advances in medicine, Fresno zoo handles special needs

May 21, 2008

It’s survival of the less-than-fittest at Fresno Chaffee Zoo.

Sheep and goats are on Celebrex. One sea lion is blind and another is half-paralyzed. A hedgehog-like critter is so old it must eat mushy food.

At nearly 20, “it’s like a 170-year-old person,” said zoo veterinarian Lewis Wright.

Advances in medicine mean animals are living longer in Fresno – and in zoos nationwide – even if they have maladies that could make them dinner in the wild.

“It’s a relatively new phenomenon, where zoos have gotten so good at what they do that we are surpassing median life expectancy,” said Andy Snider, the zoo’s director of animal care and conservation.

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Screw Worm Outbreak In Yemen

May 8, 2008

An outbreak of the insidious ´screw worm´ fly in Yemen, is threatening livelihoods, in a country where rearing livestock is a traditional way of life. In recent weeks, a Ministerial delegation was at the IAEA in Vienna, Austria, to turn to the international community for emergency assistance to fight the deadly pest.

The menacing fly lays its eggs in a cut or open wound of a warm-blooded animal. The maggots then feast off the living flesh, and can kill the animal if it´s not treated in time.

The outbreak hit the country´s coast late last year. Veterinarian, Mansoor AlQadasi, General Director of the Central Veterinarian Laboratory, says it´s the first official outbreak of ´old world´ screw worm in Yemen.

“There are about 20,000 cases of livestock affected. Most of these are sheep and goats. We have also found some human cases — mainly in children and older people,” Mr. AlQadasi said.

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A Rescued Goat Gets a Chance for a Normal Life

May 2, 2008

They are both amputees: She lost part of her right leg to bone cancer at the age of 10, and he lost part of his left leg four months ago because of an injury he most likely suffered at a Brooklyn slaughterhouse.

Her name is Jenny Brown, and she is a 36-year-old television producer turned animal rights advocate. His name is Albie, and he is a goat of unknown age and breed.

They met last August, after Albie was plucked from Prospect Park and taken to the animal sanctuary Ms. Brown has owned here since 2004. Albie was malnourished and sickly at the time, his mouth covered in sores, his leg and hoof badly infected, Ms. Brown recalled. His injuries seemed to indicate that he had been hogtied before he broke free and made his way to the park.

Ms. Brown said that she tried to save Albie’s leg, treating it with ointments and homeopathic remedies, but that the wound would not heal. In December, Albie’s leg was amputated just above the knee.

He is now awaiting a prosthesis, a very rare indulgence for a farm animal. And the same technician who fitted Ms. Brown with a new artificial leg is also designing Albie’s.

“I’ve been an amputee for most of my life, but I can run a farm, I can wrestle animals, I can carry bales of hay, thanks to modern prosthetics,” Ms. Brown said. “I thought it would be only fair to give Albie the same chance to live a normal life.”

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VIDEO: Golden Eagle Throws Goat Off Cliff

April 22, 2008

When Tuberculosis Hits Cows

April 22, 2008

Bovine tuberculosis is a progressive wasting disease. It affects mainly cattle but also sheep, goats, pigs and other animals. People who get bovine TB have to take strong antibiotics for up to nine months to cure them.

Humans can get sick from infected cows by drinking milk that has not been heated to kill germs. Another risk is eating meat that has not been cooked to seventy-four degrees Celsius.

[…]

In the early twentieth century, bovine TB probably killed more animals in the United States than all other diseases combined. To control it, the government launched a highly successful testing program. Historians say animal doctors ordered the destruction of about four million cattle between nineteen seventeen and nineteen forty.

But currently, the state of Michigan in the Midwest is fighting an outbreak of tuberculosis in cattle. Experts identified wild deer as the source of infection. More recently the neighboring state of Minnesota has also had to deal with TB in cattle and deer.

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Teenage thugs attack animals at popular safari park

April 21, 2008

Scotland’s only safari park has banned visitors from getting close to the animals after a series of sickening attacks.

Thugs have kicked llamas and pot-bellied pigs, beaten goats with branches and thrown stones at wallabies.

They speared an apple on a goat’s horns and goaded others to chase it at Blair Drummond Safari Park.

Animals became ill at its pets farm after visitors ignored warnings and fed them beef and ham sandwiches and chocolate.

David Booth, chief game warden at the park, near Stirling, said: “Visitors could walk among the animals at the pets farm.

“But the behaviour of some people – mostly teenagers and kids – has made it impossible.

“The problem has got worse in the last couple of years. Some things that happened are unbelievable.

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Kenya: Wild Animals Compete With Humans for Scarce Water Resources

April 17, 2008

Ahmed Diriye had taken his goats to a stream in Mogogashe near the northern Kenyan town of Garissa and was waiting for them to drink when he was attacked by baboons.

“I killed a baboon after they tried to force me from the ‘lagadera’ [stream in Somali],” he said, holding out his bandaged arm. “They were thirsty and wanted water just like my goats. The well is the only one with water.”

At another well, four girls abandoned their water containers after thirsty baboons attacked them. The next day, five goats were killed by the creatures while two herders sustained serious injuries following an attack by a lion.

A month after the rains were expected to start, northern Kenya is still gripped by drought conditions. Water pans, boreholes and wells have all dried up, creating problems for the pastoralist communities of the region.

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S.F. Art Institute halts exhibition showing killing of animals

March 29, 2008

 Citing threats of violence by animal rights activists, the San Francisco Art Institute said Saturday that it is canceling a controversial exhibition that included video clips of animals being bludgeoned to death, as well as a public forum it had scheduled to address the controversy.

“We’ve gotten dozens of threatening phone calls that targeted specific staff people with death threats, threats of violence and threats of sexual assaults,” said Art Institute President Chris Bratton. “We remain committed to freedom of speech as fundamental to this institution, but we have to take people’s safety very seriously.”

The exhibit that sparked the controversy was a one-person show by Paris artist Adel Abdessemed called “Don’t Trust Me,” which opened March 19.

Along with a variety of other elements, the show included a series of video loops of animals being bludgeoned to death with a sledgehammer in front of a brick wall. The animals killed included a pig, goat, deer, ox, horse and sheep.

Animal welfare groups had attacked the video clips as degrading and cruel, and accused Abdessemed of killing animals for the sake of art.

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Uganda: Residents Compensated for Lost Animals

March 7, 2008

Residents of northern and eastern Uganda who lost their animals during the war can now smile again.

The Northern Uganda Social Action Fund has distributed 192,000 animals and birds in a restocking exercise to replace those eaten by the rebels, the army or rustled by Karimojong raiders.

The fund’s education and communication specialist, Martin Okumu, said 33,557 heifers were given out to several groups in the regions.

According to him, Teso got 17,178 heifers, West Nile 2,700, Acholi 11,767 and Lango 1, 912 .

“We have also given to the communities 9,029 bulls, 18,476 goats and 10,434 pigs during the period the (compensation) project has been operational in the sub-regions,” said Okumu.

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Paternal dog Billy takes on an unusual kid

February 29, 2008

A paternal dog has adopted an abandoned baby goat as his surrogate child.

Billy the boxer has become the constant companion of the 12-day old kid called Lilly. He sleeps with the goat, licks her clean, and protects her from any dangers at Pennywell Farm wildlife centre at Buckfastleigh, near Totnes, Devon.

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Springing real animals into children’s lives

February 20, 2008

Kids love to see frogs and toads jump at Lakeside Nature Center. But it’s the leap made by the visiting kids that’s more impressive, says Susan Bray, a senior naturalist at the center. In her own words:

•“I’m really a firm believer — and this is what keeps me coming here and doing what I do — that kids really need a connection with nature. It’s called ‘nature deficit disorder’ now. Kids are getting so separated from the natural world.”•“I can’t tell you how many times — with the frogs, with an owl, with a snake — I pull the animal out to show kids and the first question is, ‘Is it real?’ Honestly, it’s scary.”
•“Kids, whether they’re wealthy or not, have their concept of the natural world pinned to things like Disney World or going to see a movie that has animation that is so real they don’t know the difference between real and animated.”
•“Many times I say, ‘Yeah, there’s not a single battery in this animal,’ and I get a lot of chuckles from the parents. But to the kids, this is a real thing they don’t get.”
•“For them to see a live frog actually move, and it’s not something controlled by battery or remote control, is pretty amazing. And, to me, that’s the opening to have a kid understand that there’s a whole bigger world out there that isn’t controlled by people.”
•“That’s what I believe is the importance of my work here on Earth. It’s helping make that connection.”

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Animal waste: Future energy, or just hot air?

January 7, 2008

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Manure, when properly processed, can provide a reliable and clean source of electrical and heat energy. And as there is so much of it, many are pinning their hopes on it as the latest new renewable energy source, leading the New York Times to recently suggest it could be “the ultimate renewable source of fuel.”

According to the United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), there are about 1.3 billion cattle worldwide (one for every five people), slightly more than 1 billion sheep, around 1 billion pigs, 800 million goats and 17 billion chickens.

Between them, they produce a lot of fecal matter — around 13 billion tons of it a year, according to various estimates.

Within that matter is 55 percent to 65 percent methane, which when released into the atmosphere is bad news for us (it traps heat at 23 times the rate that carbon dioxide does) — but when burned is another matter entirely. It gives us energy.

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