Posts Tagged ‘Uncategorized’

Red Pandas found in Langtang National Park

June 19, 2008

The finding of Red Pandas within the Langtang National Park area has encouraged conservationists.

A team of conservationists led by lecturer Hari Prasad Sharma, department of zoology (TU), had recently found one Red Panda each in Chandanbari area of Rasuwa and Dhadepani area of Nuwakot. It is believed that the areas harbor around 100 Red Pandas. The areas lie at an altitude of 2,800 to 4,000 metres above sea level.

The mission was initiated by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation’s Himalayan Landscape Project supported by WWF.

The Langtang National Park said it was preparing a long-term conservation strategy to protect the Red Pandas by securing food and habitat for them so that internal and foreign tourists could be lured to the area and contribute to the living condition of the people living in the region.

Click here for the full article.

Birds Communicate Reproductive Success In Song

June 19, 2008

Some migratory songbirds figure out the best place to live by eavesdropping on the singing of others that successfully have had baby birds — a communication and behavioral trait so strong that researchers playing recorded songs induced them to nest in places they otherwise would have avoided.

This suggests that songbirds have more complex communication abilities than had previously been understood, researchers say, and that these “social cues” can be as or more important than the physical environment of a site.

Click here for the full article.

PETA freaks out over Jessica Simpson’s ‘meat’ t-shirt

June 19, 2008

Jessica Simpson has been blasted by animals rights group PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) after wearing a T-shirt bearing the slogan ‘Real Girls Eat Meat’.

The blonde beauty – who famously questioned why tuna was nicknamed ‘chicken of the sea’ on her reality TV show Newlyweds – has come under fire from the animal rights group, who have urged her to become a vegetarian to increase her brain power.

A spokesperson for PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) said: “Jessica Simpson’s meaty wardrobe malfunction makes us thankful that no one is looking to her for food advice. Chicken of the sea anyone? The woman who thought that Buffalo ‘Wings’ came from buffalos would benefit from some good veggie brain food.”

However, it has been claimed Jessica wore the T-shirt to poke fun at her boyfriend Tony Romo’s ex-girlfriend Carrie Underwood, who has twice been named the World’s Sexiest Vegetarian by PETA.

Click here for the full article.

Chimps Not So Selfish: Comforting Behavior May Well Be Expression Of Empathy

June 19, 2008

Compared to their sex-mad, peace-loving bonobo counterparts, chimpanzees are often seen as a scheming, war-mongering, and selfish species. As both apes are allegedly our closest relatives, together they are often depicted as representing the two extremes of human behaviour.

Orlaith Fraser, who will receive her PhD from LJMU’s School of Biological Sciences in July 2008, has conducted research that shows chimpanzee behaviour is not as clear cut as previously thought. Her study is the first one to demonstrate the effects of consolation amongst chimpanzees.

In her recently published article, Fraser analyses how the apes behave after a fight. Working with Dr Daniel Stahl of Kings College London and Filippo Aureli, LJMU’s Professor of Animal Behaviour, she found that third-party chimpanzees will try to console the ‘victim’ of the fight by grooming, hugging and kissing.

Click here for the full article.

British outraged by kangaroo burgers

June 19, 2008

A British pub has taken kangaroo off its menu after pressure from a radical vegetarian group backed by Sir Paul McCartney.

The Pig and Fiddle in Bath stopped serving roo burgers after being lobbied by Vegetarians International Voice for Animals! (Viva!), which campaigned against the recent roo cull in Canberra.

Viva! has now set its sights on persuading Aussie-themed pubs in the UK to stop serving kangaroo meat and it has already convinced some butchers to stop stocking the product.

British supermarkets Sainsbury’s and Tesco stopped selling roo in the late 1990s after Viva! organised protests and boycotts.

Viva! campaigns manager Justin Kerswell said commercial killing of kangaroos could lead to the national emblem being placed on the endangered list.

Click here for the full article.

First Successful Reverse Vasectomy On Endangered Species Performed At The National Zoo

June 19, 2008

Veterinarians at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo performed the first successful reverse vasectomy on a Przewalski’s horse (E. ferus przewalskii; E. caballus przewalskii—classification debated), pronounced zshah-VAL-skeez. Przewalksi’s horses are a horse species native to China and Mongolia that was declared extinct in the wild in 1970.

Currently, there are approximately 1500 of these animals maintained at zoological institutions throughout the world and in several small reintroduced populations in Asia. This is the first procedure of its kind to be performed on an endangered equid species.

The genes of Minnesota—the horse who underwent the surgery—are extremely valuable to the captive population of the species, which scientists manage through carefully planned pairings to ensure the most genetically diverse population possible. The horse was vasectomized in 1999 at a previous institution so that he could be kept with female horses without reproducing. He came to the National Zoo in 2006.

Click here for the full article.

Deadly Diseases You Can Catch From Your Pet

June 19, 2008

Pets can serve as wonderful companions – and owning one certainly has many physical and mental health benefits.

However, with the summer months upon us, it is likely your pets will be spending more time outdoors, leaving them prone to zoonotic diseases – diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans.

A Corpus Christi, Texas, man and his daughter spent weeks in the hospital because of a diseased cockatiel bought from a PetSmart store, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by the man’s family.

Joe De La Garza, 63, later died of psittacosis, KRIS 6 News reported.

“There have been over 250 zoonotic diseases identified,” said Dr. Roger Mahr, past president of the American Veterinary Medical Association. “There is a particular focus on household pets. They are definitely an area of concern. More than 60 percent of U.S. households have pets and the value of that companionship has been recognized.”

Click here for the full article.

Pets Can Improve Your Health and Aid in Recovery

June 19, 2008

There is now evidence showing that domestic animals not only provide great companionship, but they can also help prevent illness. A recent study conducted by the University of Minnesota has highlighted the importance of regular contact with pets. The study showed that having a cat for a pet can reduce your risk of heart attack or stroke by just under 50 percent.

The study included 4,500 adults between the ages of 30 and 75 years. The study participants were followed for 10 years. The conclusion was that cat owners had a 40 percent lower risk of a fatal heart attack.

Click here for the full article.

Boy Cuddles & Plays With His 20-Ft. Pet Python

June 19, 2008

New Findings On Immune System In Amphibians May Assist Conservation Efforts

June 19, 2008

Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes produce proteins that are crucial in fighting pathogen assault. Researchers from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow and from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) characterized genetic variation and detected more than one MHC class II locus in a tailed amphibian. Unlike mammals, not much has been known until now about the immune defence of amphibians.

Globally, amphibian populations are in an unprecedented decline, to a considerable extent caused by rapidly spreading infectious diseases, such as the fungal infection Chytridiomycosis. Therefore future conservation strategies for amphibians could benefit from knowledge about species-specific adaptations indicated by MHC variation, say the researchers writing in the journal Molecular Ecology.

Click here for the full article.

Man orders pet python to attack police officers

June 19, 2008

Bridgeport police say they arrested a city man after he ordered his pet to attack two officers. Lucky for them that 9-foot-long pythons aren’t very obedient.

Police Lt. James Viadero says 21-year-old Victor Rodriguez was charged with threatening police and disorderly conduct after Monday’s incident. No one was hurt.

Officers were called to Rodriguez’s apartment on a report that he was threatening his girlfriend with the pet reptile.

Click here for the full article.

Identifying Canadian Freshwater Fish Through DNA Barcodes

June 19, 2008

New research by Canadian scientists, led by Nicolas Hubert at the Université Laval in Québec brings some good news for those interested in the conservation of a number of highly-endangered species of Canadian fish.

The use of DNA for automated species-level identification of earth biodiversity has recently moved from being an unreachable dream to a potential reality in the very near future. The potential of mitochondrial DNA in achieving this target has been successfully assessed for all of the Canadian freshwater fish communities and the approach bears some very exciting promise.

Click here for the full article.

Bionic spine gives Chris Evans’s dog a pain-free future

June 19, 2008

When vets told Chris Evans his beloved dog should be ‘written off’ after losing the feeling in its hind legs, the radio DJ refused to give up hope.

Enzo the German Shepherd had two herniated discs in his spine, leaving him paralysed and in pain.

His 42-year-old owner made sure he received the latest treatment  –  and now Enzo has a bionic spine.

Click here for the full article.

Worm-like Marine Animal Providing Fresh Clues About Human Evolution

June 18, 2008

Research on the genome of a marine creature led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego is shedding new light on a key area of the tree of life.

Linda Holland, a research biologist at Scripps Oceanography, and her colleagues from the United States, Europe and Asia, have deciphered and analyzed fundamental elements of the genetic makeup of a small, worm-like marine animal called amphioxus, also known as a lancelet.

Amphioxus is not widely known to the general public, but is gaining interest in scientific circles because of its position as one of the closest living invertebrate relatives of vertebrates. Although amphioxus split from vertebrates more than 520 million years ago, its genome holds tantalizing clues about evolution.

Click here for the full article.

Teen blames pet gerbil for 3-car accident

June 18, 2008

A teenager is blaming her pet gerbil for a car crash in Springville Tuesday.

Click here for the full article.

Mysterious Mountain Dinosaur May Be New Species

June 18, 2008

A partial dinosaur skeleton unearthed in 1971 from a remote British Columbia site is the first ever found in Canadian mountains and may represent a new species, according to a recent examination by a University of Alberta researcher.

Discovered by a geologist in the Sustut Basin of north-central British Columbia 37 years ago, the bones, which are about 70 million years old, were tucked away until being donated to Dalhousie University in 2004 and assigned to then-undergraduate student Victoria Arbour to research as an honours project. She soon realized that the bones were a rare find: they are very well-preserved and are the most complete dinosaur specimen found in B.C. to date. They are also the first bones found in B.C.’s Skeena mountain range.

Click here for the full article.

PHOTO: Birds can surf! (on each other)

June 12, 2008

Caribbean Monk Seal Gone Extinct From Human Causes, NOAA Confirms

June 9, 2008

After a five year review, NOAA’s Fisheries Service has determined that the Caribbean monk seal, which has not been seen for more than 50 years, has gone extinct—the first type of seal to go extinct from human causes.

Monk seals became easy targets for hunters while resting, birthing, or nursing their pups on the beach. Overhunting by humans led to these seals’ demise, according to NOAA biologists.

The last confirmed sighting of the seal was in 1952 in the Caribbean Sea at Seranilla Bank, between Jamaica and the Yucatán Peninsula. This was the only subtropical seal native to the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.

Click here for the full article.

Otters Reveal Their Identity

June 6, 2008

Researchers of the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research have developed two new methods, in order to be able to better estimate the numbers of European Otters (Lutra lutra) and their effects on the fish farming industry. The researchers succeeded for the first time in gathering more accurate data on the otter population in the heath and pond region of the Oberlausitz Biosphere Reserve. Genetic analyses of the faeces could prove to be a promising approach when investigating otter populations, as researchers have written in the scientific journal Conservation Genetics. The new method does not only apply to otters, but also to all vertebrates.

The information can be used to ensure effective nature conservation. Accurate information on the size of the otter population makes it possible to calculate the quantity of fish eaten per pond and hence the damage incurred to the local fish farming industry. Consequently, appropriate damage compensation would improve the acceptance of otters among the local fish farming industry and thus the protection of this endangered species, as is required by national and international law. For population size estimates, the classical method of MRR (Mark Release Recapture) is enhanced by modern DNA analyses.

Click here for the full article.

Animal welfare group says eBay auctions in US of suspect ivory increasing

June 6, 2008

An animal welfare group says eBay auctions in the U.S. of illegal or possibly illegal ivory are skyrocketing.

In a statement Friday, the International Fund for Animal Welfare says eBay affiliates in Germany, Australia, France and China have nearly eliminated illegal ivory trading on their sites. The watchdog group says, however, that sales had shifted to North America.

Click here for the full article.